Choral Evensong

describe the image

Sung in memory of Donald Teeters (1936-2014)

Sunday, March 29, 2015, 5pm
The Parish of Christ Church, Andover MA

Presented by the combined choirs of Christ Church Andover and Hamilton-Wentham

Duruflé Requiem
Howells Magnificat

Anney Barrett, soprano; Kate Jensik, cello; Barbara Bruns, organ; John Russell, conductor

Looking for Tickets to Cecilia Concerts?

Follow the link below to purchase season subscriptions or individual tickets online!

Student and senior discounts are available. Tickets to all performances may also be purchased by calling 617-232-4540 or emailing gm@bostoncecilia.org.Screen Shot 2013 09 11 at 9.52.42 AM resized 207

Follow Us for Updates!

Want Boston Cecilia Updates Sent to You?

Subscribe to ourMailing List

The Boston Cecilia's 139th Season - Upcoming Events and Concerts

describe the imageMass in B Minor: "A Birthday Tribute to Bach" at Jordan Hall, March 21, 2014 -- click for Reviews


BRAHMS: Ein Deutsches Requiem


Brahms for Cecilia

Saturday, April 11, 2015 at 8:00pm   All Saints Parish, Brookline

Carolina Friberg, soprano

Paul Max Tipton, baritone

Barbara Bruns and Carolyn Skelton, piano

Nicholas White, conductor

 

Due to rehearsals being disrupted by the recent winter storms, we have decided to postpone the program of Sacred German Music for Double Choir until October 2015. In its place, we are thrilled to offer a performance of Ein Deutsches Requiem, Op. 45, by Johannes Brahms (1833-1897). Featured soloists will be Carolina Friberg, soprano, and Paul Max Tipton, baritone. The chorus will be accompanied in Brahms’s version with piano duet by pianists Barbara Bruns and Carolyn Skelton.

Ein Deutsches Requiem, also known as "A German Requiem," considered the central work of Brahms's career, was based on texts from the Lutheran Bible and the Apocryphal King James Bible. The work developed from a choral piece to a cantata, and finally into the seven-movement Requiem for chorus, soloists, and orchestra. Brahms's four-hand piano duet score was based on a piano score he arranged for the piece at the time he composed it, but was first performed with all seven movements in 1871 at the London home of Sir Henry Thompson. In contrast to many Requiem Masses, Brahms's setting focuses not so much on those who have died as on we who are living. The piece is rich with themes of humanity and the fragility of life, together with words of comfort and hope.


Screen Shot 2013 09 11 at 9.52.42 AM resized 207